L'itinerario A del Comune di Verona - Verona itineraries

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L'itinerario A del Comune di Verona

29/04/2010
Time: 4 hours
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Questo è un'itinerario classico del centro storico di Verona, che propone le tappe principali, ottimo per chi visita Verona per la prima volta e desidera avere una panoramica generale della città. L'itinerario parte da Piazza Brà, dove si trova l'Arena di Verona, per proseguire verso Castelvecchio e lungo Via Cavour fino a Porta Borsari, porta romana di cui oggi rimane solo la facciata. Percorrendo Corso Porta Borsari giungiamo quindi in Piazza delle Erbe, l'antico foro romano, l'elegante Piazza dei Signori e le Arche Scaligere, le tombe degli scaligeri. Si continua per Via Cappello, dove andremo a visitare la famosa Casa di Giulietta per terminare con Porta Leoni, altra porta romana e la Chiesa di San Fermo, senza dubbio uno dei templi più belli di Verona.
Itinerary "L'itinerario A del Comune di Verona" has 14 stops:
A) Arena di Verona
Historical Notes. The Roman amphitheatre, the Arena, is the most renowned Veronese monument. Today the Arena is set in the historical centre and acts as a backdrop for Piazza Brà. But once upon a time, when the Romans built it, the monument was located at the margins of the urban area, outside the circle of the walls. The Arena summarises in itself almost twenty centuries of local history. Through time, it has become the very symbol of the city. Its cult has far away roots, that go back to Carolingian humanism. T...
B) Piazza Brà
Historical Notes. The Bra’ (from the German "breit", meaning "broad") began to be defined as a square only around mid sixteenth century, when Michele Sammicheli built the Palace of the Honours and gave a correct perspective to the Arena, limiting the perimeter of the future square towards the west. Another contribution was made by construction of the Palace of the Grand Guard, which defines the southern limit of the area. After paving of the area, which was finished in 1782, the Brà became the preferred place for a...
C) Castelvecchio
Historical Notes. Following the revolt headed by his half-brother Fregnano, Cangrande II no longer felt safe inside the city: on top of the surrounding city walls, he had a castle and a bridge over the Adige River built. The new dwelling was to be a palace, fortress and a guarantee of escape. The construction of the castle, entrusted to Guglielmo Bevilacqua, began around 1354. Cangrande lived there for only a little while, because on 14 December 1359, he was betrayed and killed by several assassins, paid by his b...
D) Arco dei Gavi
Historical Notes. Around mid 1st century A.D., The Arch was built to honour several members of the Gens Gavia, an illustrious family that may have been of Veronese origin. The site was chosen with care, on a road of great transit, the Postumia, at the margins of the plateau where the city could develop: the precise point where it rose is marked by a grey marble rectangle that is visible from the roadway. During medieval times the arch became a city gate and included the scala walls and Clock Tower of Castelvecchio....
E) Chiesa di San Lorenzo
Historical Notes. The current church was built at the beginning of the XII century over the remains of a previous early Christian building, built around the V or VI century and restored after 793. The new church, in the Romanesque style, was built around 1110, re-utilising part of the previous construction material. After the earthquake of 1117, the perimeter walls of the apses were raised. At the end of the century the church was completed with the addition of the transept, the women’s gallery and cylindrical t...
G) Porta Borsari
Historical Notes. Built towards mid 1st century A.D., Porta Borsari was initially called “Porta Lovia”, because of the nearby temple of Lustral Jupiter. In medieval times it was called “Porta San Zeno” and then Porta Borsari, probably because the so-called “Bursarii”, that is to say the tax collectors with bags, levied entry and exit tariffs on goods at this gate. Only the external façade towards the countryside remains of the original construction, with its covering in late imperial style. The front is located a...
H) Piazza delle Erbe
Historical Notes. Market Square (or the square of herbs) occupies a good part of the area of Verona’s Roman Court, where the Maximum Decuman and Maximum Cardo intersected. Through the centuries, the square has been the centre of the city’s political and economic life. Monuments. The square is surrounded by buildings and monuments that have marked the history of Verona. We have included in this guide the special cards for some of these buildings (the City Hall, Lamberti Tower) in the following pages. The c...
I) Piazza dei Signori
Historical Notes. “Lords’ Square” shows no signs of Roman times, even though it is very near to the ancient court, which later became “Market Square”, Piazza delle Erbe. For the history of this place, you have to start from the Scala family seigniory, bearing in mind, however, that in the square there were already the Municipal Palace and the Domus Nova. At the end of the XIII century, the square (which was then called Platea Domini vicarii), did not have today’s rectangular form; neither the palace that is now c...
J) Arche Scaligere
Historical Notes. The Scala family arches are among the most distinguished monuments of gothic art in Verona. As early as the end of the sixteenth century the arches presented serious problems of conservation. This is a theme that will be re-proposed to the attention of those responsible for public administration. While a complete restoration of the arch of Mastino was performed in 1786, it must be remembered that there was a general project of restoration in 1839. John Ruskin, who wrote of the how grace of the a...
K) Chiesa di Santa Maria Antica
Historical Notes. S. Maria Antica is in the Romanesque style and rises in the area of a small VII century church. It was rebuilt and consecrated in 1185 by the patriarch of Aquileia, Gotifredo. The present-day church became the private chapel of the Scala family, who built the family cemetery area in the church courtyard. Around 1630, the inside of the church was modified in the baroque style, but at the end of the 19th century the church was restored and regained its original style and splendour. Architecture...
L) Casa di Giulietta
Historical Notes. “Capuleti House” was long the property of the Dal Cappello family. The combination of Cappello and Capuleti led people to believe that this had been Juliet’s house, the unhappy lover of the noted Shakespearean tragedy. In reality the building dates from the XII century. In 1905 the house was purchased by the City of Verona. The building took on its current aspect only seventy years ago: Antonio Avena, director of the cities museums transformed it from an anonymous ex-stall to the home of the d...
N) Chiesa di San Fermo
Historical Notes. This is one of the most beautiful temples in Verona. The first traces of this church go back to the VIII century. The Benedictine restructuring that took place in the XI century was particularly important. It apparently started in 1070: the Benedictines built the upper and lower church and began construction of the bell tower, which was finished much later, towards the beginning of the XIII century. Architecture and Art. The façade is adorned with two loggias with several theories of arches, a b...

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